Queens Quay W Eastbound Closed

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On Monday, November 5, traffic on Queens Quay will move to one-way westbound-only between Bay St. and Lower Spadina Ave. to enable construction for the revitalization of Queens Quay. All north-south streets will remain open and eastbound traffic will be rerouted to Lake Shore Blvd./Harbour St. One-way traffic will be maintained throughout the first stage of construction from Fall 2012 through Spring 2013.

During the first stage of construction, several major utilities and municipal services will be upgraded and the TTC corridor will be rebuilt.

WHAT TO EXPECT

Cyclists
The detour bike route – an asphalt trail located in the boulevard area on the south side of Lake Shore Blvd. between Lower Spadina Ave. and York St. – will enable cyclists to bypass most of the construction area. Cyclists may use this route for either eastbound or westbound travel. To access the detour route from the east, ride north along the diagonal path through the parkette just before York St. (at the signalized intersection at Queens Quay/55 Harbour Square). From the west, access the detour route by riding north along Lower Spadina Ave. At the eastern end of the detour route, cyclists traveling further east on Queens Quay must ride south along the diagonal path to the signalized intersection at Queens Quay/55 Harbour Square and walk along the southside for approximately 150 metres to Bay St. where eastbound travel resumes. Westbound cyclists who choose to ride alongside vehicular traffic through the construction zone will be guided by appropriate signage. There will also be signage for cyclists on the detour route.

Pedestrians
Access will be maintained at all times on the north and south side of the street. When work is occurring on the sidewalk, safe passageways will be set-up to help pedestrians avoid construction.

Learn More?
Log on to www.waterfrontoronto.ca/constructingqq for project information. You may also subscribe for weekly construction email updates.

And an atrocious reroute it is too.

No one bothered to think that maybe all the gravel and glass strewn across the "path" ought to be swept up. Or the construction trailer parked on the "path" should be relocated.

Then there are some of the street crossings. I think it's at Simcoe where, on the west side, you have to cut a little north to go through the pedestrian crosswalk; but on the east side there's a fresh new curb cut five or ten metres souh of the crosswalk. Yes, I want to try to cross a busy downtown street, with cars turning off Lake Shore at speed, just far enough from the interesction to be out of sight to drivers and well beyond the dubious safety of the crosswalk, but not far enough from the intersection to have time to avoid a car if it turns from Lake Shore.

I followed the detour as far as Bay. Trying to get to Victoria and Adelaide from Bay and Lake Shore isn't a lot of fun. I think I'll bail at Simcoe next time.

If you look closely, it is still possible to see the markings on the sidewalk of the original bike route. It is on the sidewalk on the south side of Lakeshore. It was taken out temporarily in the early 1990's when they began all the building at the Harbourfront. It just conveniently never got put back in.

I haven't been in the area ffected yet, but that is how I'd be looing at to avoid all the construction

Yes, there are traces of the blue-and-green makrings at the west end of the reroute.

I don't think there's been cleaning or maintenace done since the early 1990s either, though.

Sharrows have appeared in the still-open westbound lanes of Queens Quay. I would say "overnight"; they weren't there Friday evening, and were there Monday evening.

Between about Rees and Spadina the westbound lanes narrow down. There are portable signs saying "Single file" and also signs with pictograms of bicycles taking the lane ahead of cars.

There's not much choice about taking the lane. I hoofed it up to 30+km/h and did my best to avoid the bumps.

Eastbound approaching Spadina is also a problem, as the bicycle lane goes away and there's a huge lineup of cars. Presumably the drivers will learn that it makes no sense to go south to Queens Quay from Stadium or Bathurst, only to be forced north again at Spadina. (Hmm, unless this is the way you make a left from Lake Shore to Spadina?) As I waited for the westbound light at Spadina last night, one car rear-ended another in the eastbound lanes. What fun.

So I've tried the posted detour - which has required a slalom around construction vehicles (dump truck, exca-vac, etc.) and ends short of Bay St. anyway - and a few alternatives. It's looking like the Bay to Yonge segment is the real choke point: the bike detour runs out, Front St. is closed, Lakeshore has 2 lanes of Gardiner traffic merging in from the right (not sure I want to try that again) and Adelaide is choked by lines of trucks waiting for the elevators into First Canadian Place and Scotia Plaza, which means that King St. - as much as I hate it - is probably the only reasonably safe alternative.

At least you can find a bit of space to ride in if you can pass a streetcar and stay ahead of it. (Until you reach the next one, anyway.)

Westbound in the single lane on Queens Quay can be a bit tense depending on the temperament of the driver behind you, but King St. westbound at rush hour was a disaster. Pedestrians were faster than traffic for most of Church to Spadina. I'll have to try Richmond westbound at some point, though I'll need to figure out how to get back down to the lake.

So provisionally it looks like I'll probably be going up Strachan and east on King to get to work, returning by the normal route along Lakeshore.

When car traffic is at a dead halt--as you found on King westbound in the evenings, and I found last night on Queens Quay from Bay to Rees--I just squeeze past the stopped cars, either along the curb or along the lane dividing line. I also do this southbound on Yonge from Adelaide to Front in the evening.

No, this is not safe riding. However, I do prefer it to not riding at all, which is the next alternative.

Westbound, using Richmond/Simcoe/detour might work. It will avoid the traffic on Queens Quay.

Eastbound is tougher. I went north on Simcoe, then realised that I could only get as far as Front. East on Front is hopeless, so I went west to John and north to Queen. (I was the only cyclist on John between Front and Queen.)

When the weather starts getting worse, it will be either Queen or King from Roncesvalles to Yonge and vice-versa. I would prefer Queen except the pavement through Parkdale is a disaster: bad utility patch every three metres all the way through.

I took the detour and I found it to be quite dangerous - there were pedestrians all over and the crossings weren't safe at all.

I actually found Lakeshore Eastbound proper to be better and that's how I've been going myself. I bike on Don Mills north and south for 15k every day so it's the same as that to me - the only tricky part is the Gardiner on ramp before York, but then I just take the lane and I haven't had a problem any of the days I've done it for the past week and a half. Just be careful and have your lights on and bright imho.

Peter

I took the detour and I found it to be quite dangerous - there were pedestrians all over and the crossings weren't safe at all.

I actually found Lakeshore Eastbound proper to be better and that's how I've been going myself. I bike on Don Mills north and south for 15k every day so it's the same as that to me - the only tricky part is the Gardiner on ramp before York, but then I just take the lane and I haven't had a problem any of the days I've done it for the past week and a half. Just be careful and have your lights on and bright imho.

Peter

How far did you take Lake Shore? I'm tempted to try it. It would be ideal if I could do the left turn to Yonge northbound, but that's probably a pretty sketchy turn. I guess I could do the indirect turn, and suffer yet again the very long green that Lake Shore gets and Yonge doesn't.

I tried Lake Shore this morning. I followed the detour "path" until it ended (Simcoe? York?)

Lake Shore is jampacked with cars, basically not moving. The good news is that a bicyclist won't get run over by a car standing still. The bad news is that, to get anywhere, a cyclist has to squeeze by on the right, and from Simcoe to York (I guess) it's very very narrow. Between York and Bay it's a bit better, but still not great.

I managed to make the east-to-north turn at Lake Shore and Yonge. It didn't seem too bad, but I may have been lucky in setting it up (get to the left lane, ride along the left curb until the intersection, and get on the right side of the left lane for the turn).

I won't be repeating this route. So far, straight up Bathurst to Queen seems the best. The mess of the Bathurst bridge is the worst obstacle; after that it's relatively easy.