Constant Vigilance on Simcoe, Part 2

I finally had a chance to look at the Simcoe "cycle tracks" first hand. I saw a bike cop going up and down the street. As he passed I had a quick chat:

Me: Looks like you could spend all day on just this one street.

Bike cop1: I do actually. I spend my whole shift here.

!! I was just being sarcastic about the constant vigilance previously. Turns out that's exactly their plan.

Coming back up the street I saw another vehicle in the lane plus the first one which got a ticket. The bike cop had moved up the street.

As fast as the cop could write tickets or give warnings another car would park somewhere on the street. The truck in the background was the same one that got ticketed a few minutes earlier.

On parts of the northbound lane there are traffic cones. No cars were parked in the lane. Are the cones left over from the painting or were they placed as temporary bollards to prevent cars parking?

So what's Buckley's plan? (Stephen Buckley, that is, the General Manager of Transportation Services who reportedly insisted that the Cycling Unit test the cycle tracks without any bollards.) Have a cop dedicated to Simcoe 24/7/365? How much would that cost for each of the streets—Richmond, Adelaide, Simcoe—that were supposed to get protected bike lanes with bollards or planters? Given that being a bike cop is actually a coveted job on the force, I'm not going to use the entry level salary. Instead I'll use an average of the constable levels which comes to $77,000.

Now one cop couldn't even keep on top of the bike lane parking on a short street like Simcoe, so I'd argue that there'd need to be at least two cops each on Richmond and Adelaide. That's a total of 5 cops which comes to $385,000—give or take a bunch—per year. Or $77,000 for just Simcoe.

Let's compare that large number to the cost of installing bollards on just Simcoe because it's easier for me to estimate the total number. One surface mountable plastic bollard costs ballpark $50. I don't have a clue how much the installation costs but I'm going to estimate on the really high end that each bollard costs $50 to install or replace. I think there could be at least two hundred bollards on Simcoe which comes to $20,000 for the initial installation.

But I've heard from city staff that bollards get bent and broken and have to be replaced often. So I'll again assume on the high end that 50% of all the bollards get replaced every year, which comes to $10,000 a year.

$10,000 versus $77,000 which can't even buy prevention? Penny wise, pound foolish. I would have thought only our Mayor was the master of this backwards logic but GM Buckley seems to be getting the hang of it.

  1. *I've been told a parking enforcement officer is not the same as a cop. 

Constant vigilance: no need for protected bike lanes if police stakeout every bike lane in the city 24/7

The paint on the Simcoe "cycle tracks" has dried but city staff are holding off on adding barriers (what makes a cycle track a cycle track) because Transportation Services believes enforcement and signage will do the job. They firmly hope that this will be enough to "stop to illegal bike lane parking once and for all" (and ignore other good reasons for barriers).

But reality crashed the party.

Dan Egan, Manager of the Cycling Unit, telling a driver that the fine is $150 for stopping in the bike lane.

East side of Simcoe, south of King: in front of St Andrews Church. I see a sign telling drivers that stopping is verboten. But where's Dan to explain the finer details?

Car blocking the southbound Simcoe traffic lane right next to available parking. Seriously, they could have just parked right next to it and it would have been totally legal. But with no physical separation I can understand why the driver is confused.

Transportation Services would rather not have to deal with bollards: they wear out, get banged up and have to be replaced. And they make it necessary to use smaller snow plows to keep the bike lane clear. They'd rather not put in the extra work to keep cyclists safer. So they want to run an experiment (and be the only city in the world with cycle tracks protected with nothing but paint):

“We’ll be taking a good accounting of what level of enforcement it takes, what resources, what time, and what number of tickets are given out. We’ve always had anecdotal evidence, but we’ve never had anything scientific.”

Nothing scientific? What about the last twenty five years of bike lanes? Is that not enough to convince you that enforcement doesn't work? Every year the cops would conduct a ticket blitz in the spring. Didn't make one iota of difference in driver behaviour.

“There’s some people who think we don’t always need to put physical separation, that a higher fine and better markings and enforcement will do the job,” Egan said. “We may gradually add other separation devices, but we want to see how this works first.”

"Some people"? Were they born yesterday? It would either take diverting cops from other areas or hiring more cops; cops dedicated to bike lane enforcement. About as likely as Rob Ford going cold turkey.

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